Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Cardiac Arrhythmia - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #ANH14135 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Cardiac Arrhythmia - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Depending on activity level, the heart beats about 60 to 100 times per minute. It may be higher during exercise or lower at rest. A normal heart rate and rhythm ensures the delivery of oxygen-rich blood to all of the body's organs, such as the brain and lungs. A group of cells in the heart, called the cardiac conduction system, uses electrical impulses to control the speed and rhythm of each heartbeat. Each heartbeat starts in the right atrium in the sinoatrial, or SA node, then spreads through the walls of the heart chambers, called the atria, and ventricles causing them to contract. This process repeats with each heartbeat. Problems with the cardiac conduction system cause the heart to have an abnormal rhythm called an arrhythmia. This may cause an irregular pulse. Arrhythmias may happen in the atria or ventricles. Types of arrhythmia include fibrillation, which is an irregular heartbeat rhythm, tachycardia, which is a fast heartbeat of more than 100 beats per minute, and bradycardia, which is a slow heartbeat of less than 60 beats per minute. Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia. Random impulses cause the atria to fibrillate, or twitch, rapidly and randomly. Tachycardia in the atria is called supraventricular tachycardia. In focal atrial tachycardia, small areas within the atria wall, start or pass along impulses that cause the atria to contract rapidly, but with a regular rhythm. In atrial flutter, larger areas within the atrial wall start or pass along impulses that cause the atria to contract rapidly, but with a regular rhythm. Tachycardia may also happen in the ventricles with rapid and regular contractions. The body may not receive enough blood because the ventricles contract before completely filling with blood. The most serious arrhythmia is ventricular fibrillation where many random impulses fire rapidly within the ventricular walls. In ventricular fibrillation, the ventricles are quivering instead of beating. This is a medical emergency because the heart cannot effectively pump blood to the body or itself. Sometimes, problems with the SA node or problems with the pathway of the electrical impulses to the ventricles can cause the slow heartbeat in bradycardia. If the heart beats too slowly, the body may not receive enough oxygen-rich blood. Depending on the type of arrhythmia, a doctor may recommend one or more of the following treatments, lifestyle changes, such as eating a heart healthy diet, exercising, and quitting smoking, medication, such as antiarrhythmic drugs and beta blockers, catheter ablation where thin wires inserted into the heart destroy the tissue causing the arrhythmia with hot or cold energy, and implantable devices, such as a pacemaker or defibrillator to correct the pace or rhythm of the heart.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Common Causes of Heart Failure
Common Causes of Heart Failure - ANH14129c
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Skull and Brain
Skull and Brain - 3DSAE00351e
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Brain
Brain - 3DSAE00125
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
T cells and NK Cells ExpressTNF-alpha
T cells and NK Cells ExpressTNF-alpha - 3DSC13469e
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
TNF-alpha Binds to Receptors on Target Cells
TNF-alpha Binds to Receptors on Target Cells - 3DSC13469g
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Blood Flow Through the Fetal Heart
Blood Flow Through the Fetal Heart - ANS13626
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
This exhibit is available in these languages:
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"I just wanted to let you know that after several days on trial, I settled [my client's] construction accident case for $4.5 million. Immediately after the jury was discharged, I spoke with several jurors who told me that they really appreciated the medical illustrations for their clarity in dealing with [my client's] devastating injuries. They also expressed their gratitude in being able to read from a distance all of the notations without difficulty. Obviously, the boards were visually persuasive. I am certain that this contributed to our successful result."

Michael Gunzburg, Esq.
Attorney at Law.
New York, NY

"Thank you for the splendid medical-legal art work you did for us in the case of a young girl who was blinded by a bb pellet. As a result of your graphic illustrations of this tragic injury, we were able to persuade the insurance company to increase their initial offer of $75,000.00 to $475,000.00, just short of their policy limits.

We simply wanted you to know how pleased we were with your work which, to repeat, was of superlative character, and to let you know that we would be more than willing to serve as a reference in case you ever need one. Many thanks for an extraordinary and dramatic depiction of a very serious injury which clearly "catapulted" the insurance company's offer to a "full and fair" amount to settle this case."

Philip C. Coulter
Coulter &Coulter
Roanoke, VA

"Your firm is great to work with and, most importantly for me, you get the job done on time and with the utmost professionalism. You should be proud of all those you employ, from KJ to Ben B. I've been especially pleased over the years with the work of Brian and Alice, both of whom seem to tolerate my idiosycratic compulsion to edit, but I've not found a bad apple in the bunch (and, as you know, I've used your firm a bunch!). I look forward to our continued professional relationship."

Kenneth J. Allen
Kenneth Allen & Associates
Valparaiso, IN

"I wanted to thank you for the terrific job you did illustrating my client's injuries. The case was settled at the pre-suit mediation, and I believe a good part of the success we had was due to the medical legal art you prepared.

Your work received the ultimate compliment at the conclusion of the mediation. The hospital risk manager took the exhibit with them at the conclusion of mediation, and will be using it to train nurses on how to prevent bed sores..."

Steven G. Koeppel
Troy, Yeslow & Koeppel, P.A.
Fort Myers, FL













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing