Quantcast
Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
Injecting Insulin Using a Syringe - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox AND13010 Enlarge Share
Ready to Purchase?

$999.00

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954
Item #AND13010Source #1

Injecting Insulin Using a Syringe - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
This video will teach you how to inject your insulin using a syringe. Please watch the entire video before injecting your insulin. Your health care provider may recommend that you inject insulin using a syringe to help you control your blood sugar level. Injecting insulin with a syringe involves choosing an injection site, preparing the syringe and insulin, and then injecting the insulin into your body. Your health care provider will tell you what type of insulin you need, as well as when and how much you need to inject. You will need alcohol wipes, your bottle of insulin, a new syringe for each injection, and a sharps disposal container to throw away the used syringes. A disposable syringe has the following parts-- a barrel, a plunger, a needle cap, and a needle. Selecting the injection site. Before injecting your insulin, select the injection site on your body. The areas for insulin injection include the abdomen or belly, the thighs, the back of your upper arms, and the buttocks. When selecting the injection site, be sure you use a different spot each time you give yourself an injection. Leave at least one inch away from the last injection spot. Inject your insulin at least two inches from your bellybutton, and choose a spot one inch or farther away from any scar or mole. Preparing the syringe and insulin. Step 1. Wash your hands with soap and water and then dry them. Step 2. If your insulin needs to be mixed, gently roll the bottle between your hands. Do not shake the bottle because it may cause bubbles to form in your insulin. Before injecting yourself, check the insulin in the bottle to make sure it is the type of insulin your doctor prescribed for you, not past the expiration date, not discolored, and the insulin is free of clumps. Step 3. Remove the cap from your insulin bottle. Use an alcohol wipe to clean the rubber stopper on the top of the bottle. Step 4. Remove the syringe from its package. Be sure to use a new syringe each time you inject insulin. Step 5. Remove the needle cap from the syringe. Do not touch the needle or allow it to touch any surface, and do not use the syringe if the needle is bent. Some syringes have a cap over the plunger that you may need to remove as well. Step 6. Pull back the plunger to draw in an amount of air that is equal to your insulin dose. Step 7. Hold your insulin bottle securely on a flat surface. Push the needle through the rubber on the top of the bottle. Push the plunger to inject the air into the insulin bottle. Leave the needle in the bottle. This helps to keep the right amount of pressure in the bottle and makes it easier to draw insulin into the syringe. Step 8. With the needle still in the bottle, turn the bottle and syringe upside down. Step 9. Pull back the plunger to fill the syringe with just a little more than the insulin dose you need. If you see air bubbles, tap the barrel of the syringe with your finger to make them rise to the top. Slowly push in the plunger just enough to push out the air and extra insulin. Step 10. Carefully check to make sure the amount of insulin in the syringe matches your insulin dose. Pull the needle out of the bottle and carefully lay the syringe on a flat, clean surface. Make sure the needle does not touch anything. Injecting the insulin. Step 1. Clean your injection site with an alcohol wipe. Use a circular motion to clean a spot about two inches wide. Step 2. Pinch a two inch fold of skin in the cleaned injection spot. Step 3. Hold the syringe like a pencil and quickly insert the needle straight into your skin at a 90 degree angle. Make sure the whole needle enters your skin. Step 4. Push the plunger all the way down to inject the insulin into the fat tissue beneath your skin. Slowly count to five, before removing the needle to make sure you have injected all of the insulin. Step 5. Pull the needle straight out to remove it. Step 6. Throw away the syringe into your sharps disposal container. Never throw your syringes or needles directly into the trash. Contact your health care provider if you have questions about injecting your insulin or if your blood sugar level stays above or below your target range.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
C4-5 Disc Herniation with Complex Multi-level Fusion
C4-5 Disc Herniation with Complex Multi-level Fusion - exh36502
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Layers of the Anterior Abdomen
Layers of the Anterior Abdomen - exh40267a
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lateral Male Circulatory System
Lateral Male Circulatory System - NC3D00101
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lat Pull: Behind Head
Lat Pull: Behind Head - V0280000826sh005m
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Knee Arthroscopy (condensed)
Knee Arthroscopy (condensed) - ANS00247
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Severe Right Shoulder Injuries with Arthroscopic Repairs
Severe Right Shoulder Injuries with Arthroscopic Repairs - exh74715
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
This exhibit is available in these languages:
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA

"Medical illustrations are essential evidence in personal injury litigation and MLA is simply the best I've found at producing high-quality illustrations. Your illustrators are not only first-class artists, but creative and responsive. Your turn around time is as good as it gets. My clients have won over $60 million in jury verdicts and I can't recall a case which did not include one of your exhibits. On behalf of those clients, thanks and keep up the great work!"

Kenneth J. Allen
Allen Law Firm
Valparaiso, IN
www.kenallenlaw.com

"Thank you very much for the great work on the medical exhibits. Our trial resulted in a $16 million verdict for a 9 year old boy with catastrophic injuries, and the medical illustrations definitely played key role in the trial."

David Cutt
Brayton Purcell
Salt Lake City, UT

"Medical illustrations are essential during trial for any medical malpractice case. The people at MLA have the uncanny ability of creating medical illustrations that simplify the most complex of medical concepts and human anatomy to a lay audience. The exhibits of MLA allow experts to easily describe complex concepts and human anatomy in a manner that could not be done otherwise.

In addition, their custom illustrations show in great detail the extent of injuries suffered and the devastating effects they have had on the client's anatomy. These custom illustration can show, side by side, the body before and after a catastrophic injury. The effect of this juxtaposition is unmatched by any testimony that can be adduced at the time of trial.

Even jurors after trial have commented on the ease with which they grasp medical concepts and anatomy once the MLA exhibits were introduced and used by my experts. Even judges who have "seen it all" are thoroughly impressed by the detail and sophistication of the illustrations.

I would not want to try a case without them."

Lambros Y. Lambrou
McHUGH & LAMBROU, LLP
New York, NY













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing