Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #ANH13114 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: If you have benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, your prostate gland is enlarged. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland in men. Just beneath your bladder, your prostate gland surrounds your urethra, the tube through which urine and semen exit your body. Your seminal vesicles and prostate make fluid that combines with sperm cells to create semen. During normal urination, urine flows from your bladder through the part of your urethra inside your prostate, then through the rest of your urethra to leave your body. For unknown reasons, your prostate gland may enlarge as you get older. If you have benign prostatic hyperplasia, your prostate may grow large enough to compress the part of your urethra that runs through it. As a result, your enlarged prostate may slow the flow of urine out of your body when you urinate. Left untreated, your prostate can get larger and reduce urine flow even more. This may keep you from fully emptying your bladder. See your doctor right away if you are unable to urinate. Your risk for benign prostatic hyperplasia is higher if you are age forty or older, have a family history of BPH, have other health problems, such as obesity, diseases of the heart and blood vessels, or type two diabetes, don’t exercise, or have erectile dysfunction. The symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia include frequent urination or urge to urinate, especially at night, a weak, or interrupted urine stream, and straining to urinate. Over time, untreated benign prostatic hyperplasia may cause the following complications: inability to urinate, damage to your bladder and kidneys, urinary tract infections, bladder stones, and blood in your urine. If you have benign prostatic hyperplasia with mild or no symptoms, your doctor may recommend watchful waiting, which includes getting your prostate checked every year to make sure your symptoms or health are not getting worse. If you have moderate symptoms that bother you, your doctor may recommend medications, such as alpha-blockers, or those that treat erectile dysfunction, called PDE5 inhibitors. Both of these medications relax muscle tissue in your bladder, urethra, and prostate. This can help improve your urine flow. Five alpha reductase inhibitors may also be prescribed. This medication helps to improve urine flow over several months by reducing the size of your prostate. You may receive a combination of these drugs. If medication isn’t relieving your symptoms, your doctor may recommend a surgical procedure called transurethral resection of the prostate, or TURP. During this procedure, your surgeon will insert an instrument, called a resectoscope, through your urethra to reach your prostate. Then, a wire loop at the end of the resectoscope will be used to shave off tissue, which will widen your urethra. Other minimally invasive variations on this type of procedure use lasers, microwaves, radio waves, or electrical energy* from tools inserted through the cystoscope to remove some or all of your prostate gland. If your prostate is very large, your doctor may recommend an open prostatectomy procedure. In open prostatectomy, your surgeon will make an incision in your lower abdomen. After exposing your prostate*, your surgeon will make an incision in its outer capsule. Next, the tissue inside your prostate will be removed, and the capsule incision will be closed with sutures. Finally, your skin incision will be closed with sutures or staples. You can’t prevent benign prostatic hyperplasia, but the following lifestyle changes can make your symptoms less severe: Avoid medication that can make it harder for you to urinate, such as antihistamines and decongestants; stop drinking fluids for a few hours before bedtime; avoid drinking alcohol or fluids that contain caffeine; try to empty your bladder by double voiding. To double void, urinate, wait a moment, and then try to urinate again. To find out more about benign prostatic hyperplasia, talk to your healthcare provider.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
What is TURP for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)?
What is TURP for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)? - ANH13114S104
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Open Prostatectomy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)
Open Prostatectomy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - ANH13114S105
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What is Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)?
What is Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)? - ANH13114S101
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
"Watchful Waiting" for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - ANH13114S103
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lifestyle Changes to Relieve Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)
Lifestyle Changes to Relieve Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - ANH13114S106
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Medications for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)
Medications for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - ANH13114S107
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA

"I have found that the personalized medical illustrations prepared by Medical Legal Art have been very accurate and helpful. The medical doctors, both treating physicians and expert witnesses, have commented on the accuracy and professionalism of the medical illustrations. Most importantly, your prompt service and attention upon even short notice has been tremendous. I can certainly say that the medical illustrations prepared by Medical Legal Art have assisted us in bringing cases to a successful resolution."

Paul L. Redfearn
The Redfearn Law Firm, P.C.
Kansas City, MO

"Thank you very much for the great work on the medical exhibits. Our trial resulted in a $16 million verdict for a 9 year old boy with catastrophic injuries, and the medical illustrations definitely played key role in the trial."

David Cutt
Brayton Purcell
Salt Lake City, UT

"For us, the defining feature of effective demonstrative evidence is whether, by itself, the piece will tell the story of the case. Medical legal Art provides our firm with illustrations and animations that are clear and persuasive. Their exhibits tell the story in a way that allows the jury to understand a very complex subject, very quickly."

James D. Horwitz
Koskoff, Koskoff & Bieder, P.C.
Bridgeport, CT













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing