Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Esophageal Cancer - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #ANH13112 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Esophageal Cancer - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Esophageal cancer is a disease that begins in your esophagus. Your esophagus is a muscular tube that food passes through from your mouth to your stomach. The flat, thin cells lining your esophagus are called squamous cells. Below the surface, cells divide and flatten to make new squamous cells as the old ones wear out. If you have a condition called gastroesophageal reflux or GERD, you frequently have a back flow or reflux of acid from your stomach into your esophagus. Over time, GERD may cause the squamous cells lining your lower esophagus to be replaced with gland cells that make mucus called goblet cells. This change in the lining of your esophagus is a condition called Barrett's esophagus. One type of esophageal cancer called adenocarcinoma may occur in the changed lining of Barrett's esophagus. Another type of esophageal cancer called squamous cell carcinoma occurs in the squamous cells in your esophagus. Like all cancers, both of these types begin when damaged or abnormal genetic material inside your cells causes them to grow out of control. A tumor forms as the abnormal cells begin to multiply. Over time, a lump may form in the wall of your esophagus as the tumor grows. You may have no symptoms in the early stages of esophageal cancer. Later, you may have trouble swallowing when the tumor becomes large enough to block part of your esophagus. Having trouble with swallowing may cause you to have difficulty eating. As a result, you may lose weight in a short period of time. Depending on the location of the growing tumor, you may also have pain in your chest or neck. If you have esophageal cancer, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Surgery is the most common treatment for esophageal cancer, especially in the early stages when the tumor is small. If you have a surgical procedure, your doctor will remove the section of your esophagus that contains the tumor as well as some normal tissue above and below it. The surgery may include removing part of your stomach. The remaining healthy esophagus and stomach will be attached to each other. Your surgeon may also remove nearby lymph nodes to see if cancer cells have spread to them. Your doctor may recommend chemotherapy as a main treatment for more advanced tumors or to shrink your tumor before surgery. Chemotherapy uses drugs to stop cancer from spreading by either stopping or slowing down the growth of cancer cells. Your doctor may recommend radiation therapy such as external beam radiation therapy in addition to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy damages and kills the esophageal cancer cells. Some common ways to reduce your risk of esophageal cancer include seeking treatment if you have gastroesophageal reflux or GERD, quitting smoking, and avoiding alcohol.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Dendritic Cell
Dendritic Cell - 3DSC13469d
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Protein Binds to T cell Receptors
Protein Binds to T cell Receptors - 3DSC13469b
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
T Cells
T Cells - 3DSC13469a
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
T cells and NK Cells ExpressTNF-alpha
T cells and NK Cells ExpressTNF-alpha - 3DSC13469e
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Polyprotein embedding in a Cell Membrane
Polyprotein embedding in a Cell Membrane - 3DSC00060b
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Interleukin-23 Floating towards T-helper Cell
Interleukin-23 Floating towards T-helper Cell - 3DSC13469h
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Our firm was able to settle our case at an all day mediation yesterday and I am confident that the detail and overall appearance of the medical illustrations significantly contributed to the settlement. When we require medical illustrations in the future, I will be sure to contact [MLA]."

Noel Turner, III
Burts, Turner, Rhodes & Thompson
Spartanburg, SC

"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
"Thank you very much for the great work on the medical exhibits. Our trial resulted in a $16 million verdict for a 9 year old boy with catastrophic injuries, and the medical illustrations definitely played key role in the trial."

David Cutt
Brayton Purcell
Salt Lake City, UT

"Whether it's demonstrating a rotator cuff tear, neck movement a few milliseconds after rear impact, or a proposed lumbar fusion, the Doe Report represents an instant on-line database of medical illustration for health-care and legal professionals.

Illustrations can be purchased 'as is' or modified within hours and sent either electronically or mounted on posterboard. An illustration is worth a thousand words, as juries perk up and look intently to capture concepts that are otherwise too abstract. Start with good illustrations, a clear and direct voice, a view of the jury as 12 medical students on day one of training, and your expert testimony becomes a pleasure, even on cross examination. An experienced trial lawyer should also emphasize these illustrations at the end of trial, as a means of visually reinforcing key concepts covered.

As a treating physician, I also use these accurate illustrations to educate my own patients about their medical conditions. The Doe Report is an invaluable resource, and its authors at MLA have always been a pleasure to work with."

Richard E. Seroussi M.D., M.Sc.
Diplomate, American Boards of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and PM&R
Seattle Spine & Rehabilitation Medicine
www.seattlespine.info













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing