Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Cells & Tissues
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Pediatric Fundoplication - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #ANH13096 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Pediatric Fundoplication - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children is a condition in which liquid flows backward, or refluxes, out of the stomach and into the esophagus. The esophagus is a muscular tube that connects the mouth to the stomach. It passes through a muscle called the diaphragm, which separates the chest from the abdomen. The passageway through the diaphragm is a hole called the esophageal hiatus. The wall of the esophagus has slightly thickened muscle layers where it connects to the stomach. These muscle layers, combined with part of the diaphragm, form the lower esophageal sphincter. Normally when a child swallows food, the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes, allowing the food to pass through it. Then the lower esophageal sphincter contracts to prevent food from refluxing out of the stomach into the esophagus. Sometimes the lower esophageal sphincter may relax even when the child hasn't swallowed, allowing food already in the stomach to move back into the esophagus. This condition is called gastroesophageal reflux, and may have no symptoms or only mild heartburn. However if the reflux is severe, happens often, and causes more serious symptoms, the child has a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. If the food refluxes into the esophagus, stomach acid mixed with the food can cause irritation. If the food refluxes all the way up the esophagus into the throat and down into the airways, irritation and infection of the airways can also happen. Although spitting up is normal, GERD may require a procedure called fundoplication. Before the procedure, the child will be given general anesthesia to put him or her to sleep during the procedure. A breathing tube will be inserted through the nose or mouth and down the throat to help the toddler breathe during the procedure. Commonly, the surgeon will make five tiny incisions near or in the belly button and on the right and left sides of the upper abdomen, and insert tubes for a camera and surgical instruments. Next, the surgeon will carefully find the lower esophageal sphincter near the entrance to the stomach. The esophageal hiatus may be tightened with sutures to prevent the stomach from slipping into the chest. The top, or fundus, of the stomach will be wrapped around the outside of the sphincter. The wrapped fundus will be sutured back on to the stomach to create a valve, which tightens and strengthens the sphincter. The fundoplication valve will help prevent stomach contents from refluxing back up into the esophagus. In some cases, the surgeon may insert a feeding tube, also known as a gastrostomy tube, into the child's stomach while the sphincter heels. This tube will deliver food directly to the stomach and allow trapped air to escape. Finally, the surgeon will close the incisions with disolvable sutures, or skin closure strips. After the procedure, the child will be taken to the recovery room for monitoring. Pain medication will be given. The child may continue to receive antibiotics through the IV. Within one to three days, the child will be released from the hospital. If the child has a feeding tube, the surgeon will remove it when he or she is able to eat normally.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Rupture of the Achilles Tendon and Lower Back Injuries with Surgical Repairs
Rupture of the Achilles Tendon and Lower Back Injuries with Surgical Repairs - exh4512a
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Muscles and Nerves of Lower Back
Muscles and Nerves of Lower Back - BI00013
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Muscles of the Lower Leg: Posterior (Back) View
Muscles of the Lower Leg: Posterior (Back) View - si2237
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Surgical Fixation of Left Lower Leg Fracture and Closure of Complex Laceration
Surgical Fixation of Left Lower Leg Fracture and Closure of Complex Laceration - exh73408d
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Multiple Surgical Procedures and Medical Treatments
Multiple Surgical Procedures and Medical Treatments - exh59285b
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lower Back Injuries with Surgical Decompression and Fusion
Lower Back Injuries with Surgical Decompression and Fusion - exh45008a
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Our firm was able to settle our case at an all day mediation yesterday and I am confident that the detail and overall appearance of the medical illustrations significantly contributed to the settlement. When we require medical illustrations in the future, I will be sure to contact [MLA]."

Noel Turner, III
Burts, Turner, Rhodes & Thompson
Spartanburg, SC

"I just wanted to let you know that after several days on trial, I settled [my client's] construction accident case for $4.5 million. Immediately after the jury was discharged, I spoke with several jurors who told me that they really appreciated the medical illustrations for their clarity in dealing with [my client's] devastating injuries. They also expressed their gratitude in being able to read from a distance all of the notations without difficulty. Obviously, the boards were visually persuasive. I am certain that this contributed to our successful result."

Michael Gunzburg, Esq.
Attorney at Law.
New York, NY

"Thank you for the splendid medical-legal art work you did for us in the case of a young girl who was blinded by a bb pellet. As a result of your graphic illustrations of this tragic injury, we were able to persuade the insurance company to increase their initial offer of $75,000.00 to $475,000.00, just short of their policy limits.

We simply wanted you to know how pleased we were with your work which, to repeat, was of superlative character, and to let you know that we would be more than willing to serve as a reference in case you ever need one. Many thanks for an extraordinary and dramatic depiction of a very serious injury which clearly "catapulted" the insurance company's offer to a "full and fair" amount to settle this case."

Philip C. Coulter
Coulter &Coulter
Roanoke, VA

"Medical illustrations are essential evidence in personal injury litigation and MLA is simply the best I've found at producing high-quality illustrations. Your illustrators are not only first-class artists, but creative and responsive. Your turn around time is as good as it gets. My clients have won over $60 million in jury verdicts and I can't recall a case which did not include one of your exhibits. On behalf of those clients, thanks and keep up the great work!"

Kenneth J. Allen
Allen Law Firm
Valparaiso, IN
www.kenallenlaw.com













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing