Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Incision Care Discharge Instructions - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #AND13008 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Incision Care Discharge Instructions - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Please watch the entire video before caring for your incision. This video will teach you how to care for your incision. An incision is a cut made in your skin during an operation. The edges of your incision may be held together with stitches, staples, skin glue, or skin closure strips. A bandage called a dressing covers your incision. To prevent skin infections, keep your dressing clean and dry. Taking good care of your incision will help it heal more quickly. Caring for your incision involves cleaning your incision and changing your dressing. You will need new bandages, a roll of medical tape, clean scissors, two pairs of disposable gloves, two clean, soft cloths or paper towels, a disposable plastic bag, and a wastebasket. Keep these materials away from your incision to reduce your risk of infection. Prepare materials. Step one, wash your hands with soap and water for 30 seconds, and then dry them with a clean towel or paper towels. Clean hands are the best protection against spreading infection. Step two, open a new bandage wrapper. Leave the bandage inside the wrapper, and be careful not to touch it. Step three, cut four pieces of tape, and hang them from the edge of a nearby table or counter. The pieces of tape should be the same length as the old ones around your incision. Remove old dressing. Step one, wash your hands again with soap and water, and then dry them. Step two, put on disposable gloves. Step three, with one hand, press down gently on the skin next to the old tape around your incision. With the other hand, carefully peel away the old tape toward your incision. Step four, after loosening all of the tape, remove your old dressing. Do not remove any skin closure strips covering your incision. Let them fall off on their own in about five to 10 days. If your dressing sticks to your incision, don't tear it off. Tearing it off may cause bleeding and delay healing. Moisten the dressing with warm water. Wait for a minute or two until you can easily remove it. Look at your old dressing after you remove it. If the dressing has a foul or sweet smell or it has a yellow or greenish stain, call your health care provider. Step five, place the old dressing in a disposable plastic bag. Step six, remove the disposable gloves. Throw the gloves and the plastic bag containing your old dressing in the wastebasket. Clean the incision. Clean your incision only if your health care provider says you should. Your health care provider may only want you to change the dressing. Make sure you understand what your health care provider wants you to do, and be sure to call with questions or concerns. Step one, wash your hands with soap and water, and dry them. Step two, put on a new pair of disposable gloves. Step three, always use a clean cloth, warm water, and, if your health care provider says you can, a mild anti-bacterial soap to gently remove dried material from the area around your incision. Start with the areas nearest your incision and wipe outwards or away from the incision. Use a different part of the cloth each time you wipe your skin. When the cloth is dirty, use a new clean cloth. Do not scrub or remove any scabs. Scabs protect your incision while it heals. Allow them to fall off on their own. Do not wipe or rub over stitches, staples, or skin closure strips. Unless your health care provider says you should, do not clean your incision with alcohol, iodine, or peroxide. Step four, let your incision air dry. As it dries, check your incision for the following. Stitches or staples that are out of place. the edges of your incision pulling open, bleeding around your incision, redness that extends more than one inch from your incision edges, increased skin warmth around your incision, swelling around your incision, foul or sweet smelling incision odor, or a white, yellow, or green discharge coming from your incision. Call your health care provider if you notice any of these changes. Unless your health care provider says you should, do not use ointment, lotion, or powder on your incision. Step five, remove the disposable gloves and throw them away in the wastebasket. Apply new dressing. Step one, wash your hands with soap and water, and dry them. Step two, put on a new pair of disposable gloves. Step three, pick up a gauze pad by one corner. Do not touch the side that will be next to your incision. Carefully cover your incision with the gauze pad. You may need more than one gauze pad if fluid is still coming out of your incision. Step four, hold the gauze pad in place with one hand, and tape the gauze pad to your skin with the other hand. Make sure that you seal all four edges of the dressing. If your skin is red from the tape on your old dressing, put the new tape on a different part of your skin. If your skin is swollen or has blisters, contact your health care provider. You may be allergic to the tape and need to try a different kind. Step five, remove your gloves and put them into the wastebasket. Step six, wash your hands again with soap and water, and dry them. It's normal to see mild redness and swelling around your incision edges or a clear or pinkish discharge. However, you should contact your health care provider if you notice any white, yellow, or green discharge coming from your incision, a foul or sweet incision odor, the shape of your incision changes, redness that extends more than one inch from your incision edges, increased warmth of the skin around your incision, and bleeding or swelling around your incision. Also call your health care provider if you have nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or a temperature of 101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Heart: anterior cut- away view
Heart: anterior cut- away view - 3DSAK13850
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Fetus in Utero - Cut-away view
Fetus in Utero - Cut-away view - 3DSAJ10090f
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Closed Anterior Cervical Fusion Incision
Closed Anterior Cervical Fusion Incision - 3DSBB00299g
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lens Replacement Incision
Lens Replacement Incision - 3DSBD00193b
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Lens Replacement Incision
Lens Replacement Incision - 3DSBD00193a
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Mastectomy Incision
Mastectomy Incision - 3DSBK00196g
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
"I would like to thank all of you at Medical Legal Art for all the assistance you provided. It was a result of the excellent, timely work that we were able to conclude the case successfully.

I feel very confident that our paths will cross again."

Fritz G. Faerber
Faerber & Anderson, P.C.
St. Louis, MO

"The Doe Report is a visual feast of medical information for personal injury lawyers."

Aaron R. Larson, Esq.
President
ExpertLaw.com

"For modern audiences, it is absolutely essential to use medical demonstrative evidence to convey the severity and extent of physical injuries to a jury. Your company's high quality illustrations of our client's discectomy surgery, combined with strong expert testimony, allowed the jury to fully appreciate the significance of our client's injuries.

We are very pleased with a verdict exceeding $297,000.00, far in excess of the $20,000.00 initially offered by the defendant. The medical demonstrative evidence provided by Medical Legal Art was an asset we could not have afforded to have been without."

Todd J. Kenyon
Attorney at Law
Minneapolis, MN













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing