Quantcast
Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
Drainage Tube Care - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox AND12001 Enlarge Share
Ready to Purchase?

$999.00

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954
Item #AND12001Source #1

Drainage Tube Care - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
Please watch this entire video before caring for your drain. This video will teach you how to take care of your surgical drain. Surgical drains remove fluid from under your skin near your surgical site. This helps prevent infection and encourages healing. A surgical drain consists of a drain tube that runs from your surgical site to a bulb that collects the fluid. You strip the drain tube to keep it clear and remove any clots or blockages. Then you empty the bulb when it is half full, or as instructed by your health care provider. You will need alcohol wipes, a measuring cup, and a drainage record sheet. Be sure to wear disposable gloves, if your health care providers says you should. Be careful not to pull on the tubing. You should not feel any tugging where the tube enters your skin. Step one. Wash your hands with soap and water and then dry them. Step two. Put on disposable gloves, if your health care providers says you should. Step three. Look for clots or blockages that may prevent the fluid from flowing out of the tube and into the bulb. Some clots may be hidden inside the tube, under your skin. Step four. Loosen the clots by gently squeezing the tube surrounding them. Step five. Use one hand to hold the drain tube in place where it leaves your skin. Step six. Use your other hand to pinch the tube with an alcohol wipe between your finger and thumb. Step seven. Slide your pinched fingers along the tube to force any fluid out of the tube and into the bulb. You may need to repeat steps five through seven several times to clear the tube. Try not to let go of the tube between steps. If fluid remains in the tube, or you accidentally let go, repeat steps five through seven using a new alcohol wipe. Do not allow the bulb to become more than half full. Too much fluid in the bulb reduces its ability to remove fluid from underneath your skin. Now you will begin emptying the bulb. Step eight. Hold the bulb lower than your incision, so that fluid moves out of the tube and into the bulb. Step nine. Point the bulb away from your body. Never squeeze the bulb before taking the cap off. Step ten. Remove the cap. Never touch the opening with your bare hands. Step 11. Hold the measuring cup under the bulb. Step 12. Turn the bulb upside down, and squeeze the fluid into the cup. Step 13. After removing the fluid, continue squeezing the bulb and use a new alcohol wipe to clean the top. Step 14. While still squeezing the bulb, put the cap back on the top. The depressed bulb creates suction that continuously removes fluid from underneath your skin. Step 15. Read the amount of fluid in the measuring cup. Step 16. Write the amount on your record sheet. Step 17. Empty and rinse the cup as directed. Keep the bulb below the level of your incision to help the fluid out of the tube and into the bulb. Contact your surgeon if you notice the amount of fluid suddenly increases or decreases, the odor of the fluid changes, the fluid contains pus or becomes thicker over time, your drain tube falls out or your incision opens, your incision is red, swollen, painful, or has pus coming out, or your temperature is 101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Tooth Decay
Tooth Decay - si55551338
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Appendix in Adult Male
Appendix in Adult Male - AL00183
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Left Femur Fracture with Retrograde Intramedullary Fixation Surgery
Left Femur Fracture with Retrograde Intramedullary Fixation Surgery - exh61830b
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG)
Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) - ANCE00199
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Removal of Foley Catheter (Female)
Removal of Foley Catheter (Female) - AND12004
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Removal of Foley Catheter (Male)
Removal of Foley Catheter (Male) - AND12005
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
This exhibit is available in these languages:
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Whether it's demonstrating a rotator cuff tear, neck movement a few milliseconds after rear impact, or a proposed lumbar fusion, the Doe Report represents an instant on-line database of medical illustration for health-care and legal professionals.

Illustrations can be purchased 'as is' or modified within hours and sent either electronically or mounted on posterboard. An illustration is worth a thousand words, as juries perk up and look intently to capture concepts that are otherwise too abstract. Start with good illustrations, a clear and direct voice, a view of the jury as 12 medical students on day one of training, and your expert testimony becomes a pleasure, even on cross examination. An experienced trial lawyer should also emphasize these illustrations at the end of trial, as a means of visually reinforcing key concepts covered.

As a treating physician, I also use these accurate illustrations to educate my own patients about their medical conditions. The Doe Report is an invaluable resource, and its authors at MLA have always been a pleasure to work with."

Richard E. Seroussi M.D., M.Sc.
Diplomate, American Boards of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and PM&R
Seattle Spine & Rehabilitation Medicine
www.seattlespine.info

"I have found that the personalized medical illustrations prepared by Medical Legal Art have been very accurate and helpful. The medical doctors, both treating physicians and expert witnesses, have commented on the accuracy and professionalism of the medical illustrations. Most importantly, your prompt service and attention upon even short notice has been tremendous. I can certainly say that the medical illustrations prepared by Medical Legal Art have assisted us in bringing cases to a successful resolution."

Paul L. Redfearn
The Redfearn Law Firm, P.C.
Kansas City, MO

"This past year, your company prepared three medical illustrations for our cases; two in which we received six figure awards; one in which we received a substantial seven figure award. I believe in large part, the amounts obtained were due to the vivid illustrations of my clients' injuries and the impact on the finder of fact."

Donald W. Marcari
Marcari Russotto & Spencer, P.C.
Chesapeake, VA

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing