Quantcast
Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
Robotic Prostatectomy - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

If animation does not play, download and install the latest free Flash Player plugin.
More Like ThisAdd To Lightbox ANR12003 Enlarge Share
Ready to Purchase?

$999.00

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954
Item #ANR12003Source #1

Robotic Prostatectomy - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: If you have prostate cancer that has not spread beyond your prostate, your doctor may recommend robotic radical prostatectomy to remove your prostate gland. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland in men just beneath your bladder. Your prostate gland surrounds your urethra, which is the tube through which urine will exit your body. The end of your large intestine, called the rectum, lies behind your prostate. Each of your seminal vesicles combines with a vas deferens to form an ejaculatory duct, which attaches to your prostate gland. Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of cells lining the tubular gland tissue inside your prostate. As the cancer cells multiply, a tumor forms. Before your procedure, an intravenous line, or IV, will be started. You may be given antibiotics through the IV to decrease your chance of infection. You'll be given general anesthesia. A breathing tube will be inserted through your mouth and down your throat to help you breathe during the operation. A Foley catheter will be inserted into your bladder to drain urine. Your surgeon will make a small incision near your belly button, and insert a plastic tube called a port. Carbon dioxide gas will be pumped into your abdomen through this port. The gas will inflate your abdomen, giving your surgeon more room to see and move the surgical tools. After your abdomen is inflated, a high-definition camera will be inserted into this port. Your surgeon will make additional port incisions for robotic instruments, as well as for instruments used by patient-side assistants. An assistant will insert all of the robotic tools through these ports. Unlike standard laparoscopic instruments, tools, can rotate 360 degrees and have more flexibility than the human wrist. Seated at a special console, your surgeon will operate the robotic arms and the camera with joystick-like controls and foot pedals. A computer will translate the exact movements of your surgeon's fingers into precise movements of the surgical tools. At the same time, a high-definition vision system will provide a magnified, three-dimensional, stereoscopic view of the surgical area. Your surgeon will separate tissue surrounding your bladder. Using the Foley catheter as a guide, your surgeon will cut your urethra between your bladder and your prostate. Each seminal vesicle and vas deferens will be identified and separated from your bladder. Then each vas deferens will be cut. To prevent injury to your rectum, your surgeon will separate it from the back of your prostate. To preserve sexual function, your surgeon will carefully tease away nerves and blood vessels on each side of your prostate. This nerve-sparing step is only performed if you had sexual function prior to surgery, the tumor does not extend into the nerves, and your surgeon has the necessary skill and experience. Next, your surgeon will cut your urethra at the other end of your prostate. This cut will free your prostate so that it can be removed. Lymph nodes near your prostate may also be removed to determine if your cancer has spread. Finally, your urethra will be reattached to your bladder. At the end of your procedure, the tiny incisions will be closed with stitches, staples, surgical glue, or closure tape dressings. You will have a catheter in your bladder to keep it drained. This will usually be left in place for about a week after surgery. Soon after your surgery, your breathing tube will be removed, and you'll be taken to the recovery area for monitoring. You will be given pain medication as needed. You may continue to receive antibiotics through your IV. Your bladder may be flushed intermittently with a sterile solution to wash out accumulated blood and clots. Most patients are released from the hospital the same day or one day after the procedure.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Progression of Tumor Mass within the Lung
Progression of Tumor Mass within the Lung - exh5082
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Electric Pulse Generator
Electric Pulse Generator - CB00075
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Placement of Gastrostomy Tube
Placement of Gastrostomy Tube - exh45548a
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Post-Concussion Syndrome
Post-Concussion Syndrome - exh59472c
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Stages of Presentation in Delivery: 0
Stages of Presentation in Delivery: 0 - 3DSAJ00030nn
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Cervical Spine Injuries with Anterior Fusions
Cervical Spine Injuries with Anterior Fusions - exh78856
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
This exhibit is available in these languages:
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"We are extremely pleased with the quality of the medical exhibits and the timely manner in which they were provided. I will certainly recommend your company to my business associates who could benefit from your services. Please tell Brian Wilson [Director of Content Development, Senior Medical Illustrator] that he did an exceptional job on these exhibits."

K. Henderson
Dunaway and Associates
Anderson, SC

"Medical illustrations are essential during trial for any medical malpractice case. The people at MLA have the uncanny ability of creating medical illustrations that simplify the most complex of medical concepts and human anatomy to a lay audience. The exhibits of MLA allow experts to easily describe complex concepts and human anatomy in a manner that could not be done otherwise.

In addition, their custom illustrations show in great detail the extent of injuries suffered and the devastating effects they have had on the client's anatomy. These custom illustration can show, side by side, the body before and after a catastrophic injury. The effect of this juxtaposition is unmatched by any testimony that can be adduced at the time of trial.

Even jurors after trial have commented on the ease with which they grasp medical concepts and anatomy once the MLA exhibits were introduced and used by my experts. Even judges who have "seen it all" are thoroughly impressed by the detail and sophistication of the illustrations.

I would not want to try a case without them."

Lambros Y. Lambrou
McHUGH & LAMBROU, LLP
New York, NY

"It is with great enthusiasm that I recommend Medical Legal Art. We have used their services for three years and always found their professionalism, quality of work, and timely attention to detail to exceed our expectations. We recently settled two complicated catastrophic injury cases. One medical malpractice case involving a spinal abscess settled for 3.75 million and the other involving injuries related to a motor vehicle accident settled for 6.9 million. We consider the artwork provided by MLA to have been invaluable in helping us to successfully conclude these cases.

I highly recommend MLA to anyone seeking high quality, detailed medical legal artwork."

E. Marcus Davis, Esq.
Davis Zipperman, Krischenbaum & Lotito
Atlanta, GA
www.emarcusdavis.com

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing