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Labor and Delivery - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Labor and Delivery - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT:
During a vaginal childbirth, the first stage of labor lasts about 12 to 19 hours, and starts when your baby settles lower into your pelvis. In response, your cervix begins to efface, or become thinner, and dilate, or widen. During this time, you may feel strong, regular contractions occurring every 5 to 20 minutes, and lower back pain and cramping that doesn't go away. You may see a brownish or reddish mucus discharge, which could be the mucus plug at the opening of your cervix falling out. Your water may break, which can either be a large gush of fluid or a continuous trickle. If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor or midwife to see if you should go to the hospital. At the beginning of stage 2 of labor, which can last from a few minutes to 3 hours, your cervix is fully dilated to 10 centimeters, and your baby's head has moved beyond the cervical opening into your birth canal. During this stage, you will begin to push your baby out. You may instinctively push when you feel the urge, or you may need coaching from your doctor, midwife, or labor nurse as to when to push and when to rest. In a normal delivery, your baby's head will rotate to face your back. During active labor, your uterus is divided into an active segment that contracts, pushing the baby downward, and a flexible passive segment that remains relaxed, stretching to provide more room for the baby to pass through. In some cases, when the top of your baby's head appears, or crowns, your doctor may make a small cut, called an episiotomy, to enlarge the vaginal opening. Then you will continue pushing your baby out. As your baby's head passes through the birth canal, it molds into an elongated shape. An elongated head shape will resolve itself within a few days as the skull bones shift back into place. After your baby's head exits the birth canal, his or her head and shoulders will rotate to help the shoulders pass through the birth canal. Your baby's shoulders are delivered one after the other, in order to fit through your pelvis. Once the shoulders emerge, the rest of your baby slides out easily. After your baby is born, his or her umbilical cord will be cut. In stage 3 of labor, which may last 5 to 30 minutes, mild contractions will help push the placenta out of the uterus. During this stage, you and your baby may begin bonding through skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Medical illustrations are essential evidence in personal injury litigation and MLA is simply the best I've found at producing high-quality illustrations. Your illustrators are not only first-class artists, but creative and responsive. Your turn around time is as good as it gets. My clients have won over $60 million in jury verdicts and I can't recall a case which did not include one of your exhibits. On behalf of those clients, thanks and keep up the great work!"

Kenneth J. Allen
Allen Law Firm
Valparaiso, IN
www.kenallenlaw.com

"Your firm is great to work with and, most importantly for me, you get the job done on time and with the utmost professionalism. You should be proud of all those you employ, from KJ to Ben B. I've been especially pleased over the years with the work of Brian and Alice, both of whom seem to tolerate my idiosycratic compulsion to edit, but I've not found a bad apple in the bunch (and, as you know, I've used your firm a bunch!). I look forward to our continued professional relationship."

Kenneth J. Allen
Kenneth Allen & Associates
Valparaiso, IN

"For us, the defining feature of effective demonstrative evidence is whether, by itself, the piece will tell the story of the case. Medical legal Art provides our firm with illustrations and animations that are clear and persuasive. Their exhibits tell the story in a way that allows the jury to understand a very complex subject, very quickly."

James D. Horwitz
Koskoff, Koskoff & Bieder, P.C.
Bridgeport, CT

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA













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