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Fertilization - Medical Animation
 
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Fertilization - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Fertilization is the epic story of a single sperm facing incredible odds to unite with an egg, and form a new human life. It is the story of all of us. During sexual intercourse, about 300 million sperm enter the vagina. Soon afterward, millions of them will either flow out of the vagina, or die in its acidic environment. However, many survive because of the protective elements provided in the fluid surrounding them. Next, the sperm must pass through the cervix, an opening into the uterus. Usually it remains tightly closed, but here the cervix is open for a few days while the woman ovulates. The sperm swim through the cervical mucus, which is thinned to a more watery consistency for easier passage. Once inside the cervix, the sperm continue swimming towards the uterus. Though millions will die trying to make it through the mucus, some sperm remain behind, caught in the folds of the cervix. But they may later continue the journey as a back-up after the first group. Inside the uterus, muscular uterine contractions assist the sperm on their journey. However, resident cells from the woman's immune system, mistaking this sperm for foreign invaders, destroy thousands more. Next, half the sperm head for the empty fallopian tube, while the other half swim toward the tube containing the unfertilized egg. Now, only a few thousand remain. Inside the fallopian tube, tiny cilia push the egg toward the uterus. To continue, the sperm must surge against this motion to reach the egg. Some sperm get trapped in the cilia and die. During this part of the journey, chemicals in the reproductive tract cause the membranes covering the heads of the sperm to change. As a result, the sperm become hyperactive, swimming harder and faster toward their destination. At long last, the sperm reach the egg. Only a few dozen of the original 300 million sperm remain. The egg is covered with a layer of cells called the corona radiata. The sperm must push through this layer to reach the outer layer of the egg, the zona pellucida. When sperm reach the zona pellucida, they attach to specialized sperm receptors on the surface, which triggers their acrosomes to release digestive enzymes, enabling the sperm to burrow into the layer. Inside the zona pellucida is a narrow, fluid-filled space just outside the egg cell membrane. The first sperm to make contact will fertilize the egg. After a perilous journey against incredible odds, a single sperm attaches to the egg cell membrane. Within a few minutes, the outer membranes fuse and the egg pulls the sperm inside. This event causes changes in the egg membrane that prevent other sperm from attaching to it. Next, the egg releases chemicals that push other sperm away from the egg, and create an impenetrable fertilization membrane. As is the reaction spreads outward, the zona pellucida hardens, trapping any sperm unlucky enough to be caught inside. Outside the egg, sperm are no longer able to attach to the zona pellucida. Meanwhile, inside the egg, the tightly packed male genetic material spreads out. A new membrane forms around the genetic material, creating the male pronucleus. Inside, the genetic material reforms into 23 chromosomes. The female genetic material, awakened by diffusion of the sperm with the egg, finishes dividing, resulting in the female pronucleus, which also contains 23 chromosomes. As the male and female pronuclei form, spider-like threads, called microtubules, pull them toward each other. The two sets of chromosomes join together, completing the process of fertilization. At this moment, a unique genetic code arises, instantly determining gender, hair color, eye color, and hundreds of other characteristics. This new single cell, the zygote, is the beginning of a new human being. And now the cilia in the fallopian tube gently sweep the zygote toward the uterus, where he or she will implant in the rich uterine lining, growing and maturing for the next nine months, until ready for birth.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"There is nothing like a great graphic depicting the real nature and extent of a victim's injuries to get full value for your client. I use Medical Legal Art for mediations as well as trial."

Geoff Wells
Greene, Broillet, Panish & Wheeler
Santa Monica, CA

"It is with great enthusiasm that I recommend Medical Legal Art. We have used their services for three years and always found their professionalism, quality of work, and timely attention to detail to exceed our expectations. We recently settled two complicated catastrophic injury cases. One medical malpractice case involving a spinal abscess settled for 3.75 million and the other involving injuries related to a motor vehicle accident settled for 6.9 million. We consider the artwork provided by MLA to have been invaluable in helping us to successfully conclude these cases.

I highly recommend MLA to anyone seeking high quality, detailed medical legal artwork."

E. Marcus Davis, Esq.
Davis Zipperman, Krischenbaum & Lotito
Atlanta, GA
www.emarcusdavis.com

"Whether it's demonstrating a rotator cuff tear, neck movement a few milliseconds after rear impact, or a proposed lumbar fusion, the Doe Report represents an instant on-line database of medical illustration for health-care and legal professionals.

Illustrations can be purchased 'as is' or modified within hours and sent either electronically or mounted on posterboard. An illustration is worth a thousand words, as juries perk up and look intently to capture concepts that are otherwise too abstract. Start with good illustrations, a clear and direct voice, a view of the jury as 12 medical students on day one of training, and your expert testimony becomes a pleasure, even on cross examination. An experienced trial lawyer should also emphasize these illustrations at the end of trial, as a means of visually reinforcing key concepts covered.

As a treating physician, I also use these accurate illustrations to educate my own patients about their medical conditions. The Doe Report is an invaluable resource, and its authors at MLA have always been a pleasure to work with."

Richard E. Seroussi M.D., M.Sc.
Diplomate, American Boards of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and PM&R
Seattle Spine & Rehabilitation Medicine
www.seattlespine.info

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA













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