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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Medical Animation

 

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: The brain is the most complex part of the human body. This three-pound organ is the seat of intelligence, database of memories, interpreter of the senses, and the director of all movement. Lying in its bony shell and washed by protective fluid, the brain is also the most fragile organ in the body, with the same texture and consistency as gelatin. Within the brain are over 100 billion nerve cells, called neurons, sending electrical and chemical signals to and from the body. Each neuron has a cell body, a long nerve fiber called an axon, and projections of the cell body called dendrites. Dendrites extend out from the cell body to receive messages from other nerve cells. Axons in the brain connect neurons with each other, which in turn provide extensive interconnections with other brain areas. Because the brain and its nerve cells are so fragile, sudden rapid movements of the head can cause injuries. During one such injury, called coup-contrecoup or acceleration-deceleration injury, the brain bounces back and forth against the bony interior wall of the skull. In high-speed coup-contrecoup injuries, the impact may be violent enough to cause swelling and bruising of the brain tissue called a contusion. However, in cases involving low-speed coup-contrecoup injuries, the resulting damage may not be visible to the naked eye. As the brain moves back and forth within the skull, areas of varying density in the brain slide over each other at different speeds. Axons crossing these junctions experience tremendous shearing forces, causing them to stretch and tear from the cell body. This event is called axonal shearing or diffuse axonal injury. Brain damage can continue to occur for hours or days after the initial injury. Damage to the axons can lead to a breakdown of communication among neurons in the brain. The torn axons quickly degenerate, releasing toxic levels of chemicals called neurotransmitters into the extracellular space. In turn, many of the surrounding neurons begin to die over the next 24 to 48 hours, worsening the initial effects of the injury. Mild to moderate cases of diffuse axonal injury, or DAI, may result in symptoms such as brief loss of consciousness, impaired long-term memory, reduced problem-solving ability, lower social inhibition, and problems with attention and perception. Severe cases of diffuse axonal may result in a coma or a persistent vegetative state. In the United States, over 1 million cases of mild traumatic brain injuries, including diffuse axonal injury, are reported each year. Of this number, over 300,000 patients suffer long-term effects from the damage. Computed tomography, or CT, and magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, are tests that can be performed to check for mild traumatic brain injury. The results of these tests usually show a normal reading. Therefore, doctors must rely on patient history and a clinical exam to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"There is nothing like a great graphic depicting the real nature and extent of a victim's injuries to get full value for your client. I use Medical Legal Art for mediations as well as trial."

Geoff Wells
Greene, Broillet, Panish & Wheeler
Santa Monica, CA

"For modern audiences, it is absolutely essential to use medical demonstrative evidence to convey the severity and extent of physical injuries to a jury. Your company's high quality illustrations of our client's discectomy surgery, combined with strong expert testimony, allowed the jury to fully appreciate the significance of our client's injuries.

We are very pleased with a verdict exceeding $297,000.00, far in excess of the $20,000.00 initially offered by the defendant. The medical demonstrative evidence provided by Medical Legal Art was an asset we could not have afforded to have been without."

Todd J. Kenyon
Attorney at Law
Minneapolis, MN

"At 3 PM it hit me--I needed exhibits of a tracheostomy, a coronary artery bypass and a deep vein thrombosis--all in time for a for-trial video deposition the next day. The Doe Report had each exhibit on line. In addition, I ran across an exhibit I hadn't even thought of: reduced ejection fraction after a heart attack. Because this was a video deposition, I could use the e-mail version of the medical exhibit, print it on my color copier, and let the camera zoom in. For $400, less than one blow-up by one of The Doe Report's competitors, I got four first-rate exhibits in less than a day. The Doe Report saved me time and money."

Tracy Kenyon Lischer
Pulley Watson King & Lischer
Durham, NC
www.PWKL.com

"A few words about The Doe Report: recently in a brachial plexus injury case, we used an image from The Doe Report to demonstrate the injury. We downloaded the PDF file image, and were amazed at the quality. The hard copies that you sent were even more clear. As well, we could not have been happier when you customized the image and reversed the injury from the left shoulder to the right shoulder, which is where our client's injury was.

The speed and cost-effectiveness of the product made it the perfect tool for our purposes. We will use The Doe Report again in future cases."

Andrew Needle
Needle Gallagher & Ellenberg, P.A.
Miami, FL













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