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Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Surgery - Medical Animation
 
This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this animation for other purposes, click here.

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Surgery - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the four main ligaments connecting the femur to the tibia. The ACL provides stability as you move your knee. A torn ACL may occur if your a knee joint over-rotates, or if you receive a direct blow to the front of your knee. If your ACL tears through completely, your doctor may recommend surgery to repair it. Before your procedure, you will receive either spinal anesthesia, which will numb your body from the chest down, or general anesthesia, which will put you to sleep for the duration of the procedure. During this arthroscopic procedure, your surgeon will make a few incisions around your knee, through which he or she will insert surgical instruments including a camera. The camera will transmit images to a TV monitor, which the surgeon will view during the procedure. First, your surgeon will remove the remaining portions of your torn ACL from your knee. Then, your surgeon will remove part of your patellar tendon to use as the graft, or obtain donor tissue. Your surgeon will create attachment points for the graft by drilling a small tunnel in the end of your tibia, then another at the end of your femur. Your surgeon will place one end of the patellar tendon graft in the tibial tunnel. Then, he or she will pull the graft up through the knee joint and into the femoral tunnel to create a new ACL tendon. Finally, your surgeon will place small screws in the tunnels at either end of the new ACL to hold it in place. Over the next six to eight weeks, bone growth will fill in these tunnels, further stabilizing the graft. At the end of the procedure, your doctor will remove the instruments and close the incisions. This procedure typically lasts two to two and 1/2 hours. After the procedure, you will go to the recovery room for two to three hours, and then go home. You will likely need a knee brace and crutches for one to four weeks. Supervised physical therapy should begin two or three days after surgery, and continue for 6 to 10 weeks. After this time, continue with self-directed therapy as long as needed. It takes about nine months for a reconstructed ACL to fully heal. You should avoid contact sports, racquet sports and other sports that require rapid direction changes until you obtain approval from your physician.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"I just wanted to let you know that after several days on trial, I settled [my client's] construction accident case for $4.5 million. Immediately after the jury was discharged, I spoke with several jurors who told me that they really appreciated the medical illustrations for their clarity in dealing with [my client's] devastating injuries. They also expressed their gratitude in being able to read from a distance all of the notations without difficulty. Obviously, the boards were visually persuasive. I am certain that this contributed to our successful result."

Michael Gunzburg, Esq.
Attorney at Law.
New York, NY

"I wanted to take some time out to let you know what a wonderful job you did with the 'collapsed lung/fractured rib' illustrations. They were both detailed and accurate. My medical expert was comfortable working with them and he spent at least an hour explaining to the jury the anatomy of the lungs, the ribs and the injuries depicted in the illustrations. Needless to say, the jury was riveted to the doctor during his testimony.

The jury returned a verdict for $800,000.00 and I'm sure we would not have done so well if not for the visualizations we were able to put forth with your assistance. Lastly, my special thanks to Alice [Senior Medical Illustrator] who stayed late on Friday night and patiently dealt with my last minute revisions."

Daniel J. Costello
Proner & Proner
New York, NY

"It is my experience that it's much more effective to show a jury what happened than simply to tell a jury what happened. In this day and age where people are used to getting information visually, through television and other visual media, I would be at a disadvantage using only words.

I teach a Litigation Process class at the University of Baltimore Law Schooland use [Medical Legal Art's] animation in my class. Students always saythat they never really understood what happened to [to my client] until theysaw the animation.

Animations are powerful communication tools that should be used wheneverpossible to persuade juries."

Andrew G. Slutkin
Snyder Slutkin & Kopec
Baltimore, MD
"Our practice involves medical negligence cases exclusively. We have six attorneys and one physician on staff. We have used Medical Legal Art's staff for every one of our cases over the past 12 years and have found their services to be extraordinary. The transformation of medical records into powerful graphic images has without fail been handled expertly, expeditiously and effectively translating into superb results for our clients, both in the courtroom and in settlement. Every case can benefit from their excellent work and we unqualifiedly recommend their services. They are the best!"

Chris Otorowski
Morrow and Otorowski
Bainbridge Island, Washington
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