Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Patient Health Articles
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login

Ovulation - Medical Animation

 

This animation may only be used in support of a single legal proceeding and for no other purpose. Read our License Agreement for details. To license this image for other purposes, click here.

Ready to License?

Item #ANH09353 — Source #1

Order by phone: (800) 338-5954

Ovulation - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Ovulation is a part of the menstrual cycle when the ovary releases a ripe egg, or ovum. Inside the ovary are hundreds of thousands of follicles. Each follicle is a hollow ball of cells with an immature egg in the center. The typical 28 day menstrual cycle begins on the first day of menstrual bleeding. During the first seven days of the cycle, a few follicles begin to grow at the same time. These maturing follicles secrete estrogen hormone into the bloodstream to prepare the lining of the uterus for pregnancy. Around day seven, all of the follicles stop growing and begin to generate, except for one. This dominant follicle continues to grow and nourishes the developing egg inside it. Around day 12, the follicle secretes a large amount of estrogen into the bloodstream. When the estrogen reaches the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the brain, the anterior, or front part of the pituitary gland, releases a huge surge of luteinizing hormone into the bloodstream. Around day 14, luteinizing hormone causes the follicle to undergo a sudden growth spurt. Right before ovulation, the egg detaches from the inside of the follicle. The bulging follicle releases chemicals, causing one of the two fallopian tubes to move in closer and surround the follicle. The follicle swells until it bursts open, ejecting the egg and fluid from the follicle into the abdominal cavity. In response the fimbriae, tiny projections at the end of the fallopian tube, sweep across the ovulation site and pick up the egg. Microscopic cilia on the fimbriae surface, transport the egg to the entrance of the fallopian tube. Inside the walls of the fallopian tube, muscular contractions gently push the egg towards the uterus. After ovulation, the egg lives for 12 to 24 hours, so it must be fertilized by a sperm from the male during this time for a woman to become pregnant. If it's not fertilized, the egg dissolves away and is shed along with the uterine lining during menstruation.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REVIEW THESE ITEMS:
Female Reproductive Organs
Female Reproductive Organs - si55551118
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Female Reproductive System Organs
Female Reproductive System Organs - si55550940
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Blood Supply of the Female Reproductive Organs
Blood Supply of the Female Reproductive Organs - exh4510
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Female Reproductive Organs, Front Cut-away View
Female Reproductive Organs, Front Cut-away View - BJ00013
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Blood Supply of the Female Reproductive Organs
Blood Supply of the Female Reproductive Organs - exh4510-nl
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Female Reproductive Organs with Parasympathetic Nerves
Female Reproductive Organs with Parasympathetic Nerves - AH00021
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"I wanted to thank you for the terrific job you did illustrating my client's injuries. The case was settled at the pre-suit mediation, and I believe a good part of the success we had was due to the medical legal art you prepared.

Your work received the ultimate compliment at the conclusion of the mediation. The hospital risk manager took the exhibit with them at the conclusion of mediation, and will be using it to train nurses on how to prevent bed sores..."

Steven G. Koeppel
Troy, Yeslow & Koeppel, P.A.
Fort Myers, FL

"We got a defense verdict yesterday! Your exhibit was extremely helpful in showing the jury how unlikely it is to damage all four of the nerve branches which control the sense of taste."

Karen M. Talbot
Silverman Bernheim & Vogel, P.C.
Philadeplphia, PA

"I just wanted to let you know that after several days on trial, I settled [my client's] construction accident case for $4.5 million. Immediately after the jury was discharged, I spoke with several jurors who told me that they really appreciated the medical illustrations for their clarity in dealing with [my client's] devastating injuries. They also expressed their gratitude in being able to read from a distance all of the notations without difficulty. Obviously, the boards were visually persuasive. I am certain that this contributed to our successful result."

Michael Gunzburg, Esq.
Attorney at Law.
New York, NY

"The illustrations have consistently been well documented, accurate and timely. Most important though is that the illustrations demonstrate to juries and claims people the persuasive power of visual communication. Our firm has achieved multiple eight figure settlements and verdicts over the past ten years... Medical Legal Art has been there with us on every case."

Thomas C. Jones
Davis, Bethune & Jones, L.L.C.
Kansas City, MO
www.dbjlaw.net













Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing