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Atherosclerosis - Medical Animation
 
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Item #ANS00260Source #1

Atherosclerosis - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: Atherosclerosis is a life-threatening disease that may have begun to develop during childhood. This condition is a process in which deposits of fatty material, called plaque, build up inside the walls of arteries, reducing or completely blocking blood flow. Although the exact causes of atherosclerosis are not clear, many scientists think it begins with damage to the inner wall of an artery, called the endothelium. Substances traveling in the blood, such as cholesterol, fats and cellular waste products, accumulate inside the damaged area of the arterial wall. Chemical reactions occurring within the buildup of material cause cholesterol molecules to oxidize. This initiates an inflammatory response in which the endothelial cells at the damage site release chemicals that signal a call for help. In response, monocytes from the bloodstream travel to the damage site. Stimulation from oxidized cholesterol converts the monocytes into macrophages. The macrophages eat and digest the cholesterol molecules. As a result of this process, the macrophages change into foam cells, which accumulate to form plaque. As the plaque increases in size, the arterial wall thickens and hardens. At the same time, smooth muscle cells within the arterial wall begin to multiply. Most of the smooth muscle cells move to the surface of the plaque. These cells contribute to the formation of a firm fibrous 'cap' covering the plaque. Eventually, the passageway through the artery narrows enough to reduce blood flow and the amount of oxygen received by the organs it supplies. Over time, the cap may erode and break open, releasing plaque into the bloodstream. The plaque can flow downstream and contribute to the formation of a blood clot, which can stop blood flow. As a result, limited blood supply is available to the areas surrounding the partially blocked artery, degrading and potentially killing the neighboring tissue.

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What attorneys say about MLA and The Doe Report:
"Our firm was able to settle our case at an all day mediation yesterday and I am confident that the detail and overall appearance of the medical illustrations significantly contributed to the settlement. When we require medical illustrations in the future, I will be sure to contact [MLA]."

Noel Turner, III
Burts, Turner, Rhodes & Thompson
Spartanburg, SC

"For modern audiences, it is absolutely essential to use medical demonstrative evidence to convey the severity and extent of physical injuries to a jury. Your company's high quality illustrations of our client's discectomy surgery, combined with strong expert testimony, allowed the jury to fully appreciate the significance of our client's injuries.

We are very pleased with a verdict exceeding $297,000.00, far in excess of the $20,000.00 initially offered by the defendant. The medical demonstrative evidence provided by Medical Legal Art was an asset we could not have afforded to have been without."

Todd J. Kenyon
Attorney at Law
Minneapolis, MN

"I wanted to thank you for the terrific job you did illustrating my client's injuries. The case was settled at the pre-suit mediation, and I believe a good part of the success we had was due to the medical legal art you prepared.

Your work received the ultimate compliment at the conclusion of the mediation. The hospital risk manager took the exhibit with them at the conclusion of mediation, and will be using it to train nurses on how to prevent bed sores..."

Steven G. Koeppel
Troy, Yeslow & Koeppel, P.A.
Fort Myers, FL

"This past year, your company prepared three medical illustrations for our cases; two in which we received six figure awards; one in which we received a substantial seven figure award. I believe in large part, the amounts obtained were due to the vivid illustrations of my clients' injuries and the impact on the finder of fact."

Donald W. Marcari
Marcari Russotto & Spencer, P.C.
Chesapeake, VA













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