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Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Removal) - Medical Animation

 

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Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Removal) - Medical Animation
MEDICAL ANIMATION TRANSCRIPT: The gallbladder is a pear shaped pouch underneath your liver. With the liver, it attaches to the small intestine through a series of tubes called ducts. Bile, a substance made by the liver to break down fat, is stored in the gallbladder. When fatty food from a meal reaches the small intestine, the gallbladder releases bile into it to help digest the fat. Cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder. It is usually done when there is evidence of gallbladder disease, such as gallstones or polyps. It is also done for biliary dyskinesia. Which is a condition where the gallbladder doesn't work properly. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy requires only small keyhole incisions through the abdomen, known as ports. To reach the gallbladder, the surgeon will insert tubes, called trocars, through these ports. One port is usually located at the navel or umbilicus. Carbon dioxide gas pumped through the umbilical port will inflate the abdomen so its contents can be viewed more easily. Next, your surgeon will insert the laparoscope through the umbilical port. Images from its camera will be transmitted to a video monitor in the operating room. Using instruments passed through other ports, your surgeon will grasp the gallbladder, clip off its main artery and duct, drop it into a specimen bag, and remove it through one of the ports. After the laparoscope is removed, a port valve will be left in place briefly to allow all of the carbon dioxide to escape from the abdomen. The incisions will be closed with sutures, followed by skin glue or skin closure tape. If there are complications with your laparoscopic procedure, your surgeon will switch to an open procedure with a larger incision.
CholecystectomyrnrnrnRemoval of the gallbladder, called cholecystectomy, is usually performed when there is evidence of gallstones or inflammation of the gallbladder. Symptoms of gallbladder disease usually consisting of intermittent right upper abdominal pain most commonly occur when gallstones temporarily block one of two ducts that carry bile from the gallbladder to the intestine. If the stones do not pass, the gallbladder may become swollen, inflamed, or infected which may lead to more severe symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and fever. rnrnTraditional cholecystectomy requires a large incision and a lengthy period of recuperation. Newer laparoscopic techniques require only keyhole incisions and the recovery period is much shorter. rnrnBefore the procedure, an intravenous line will be started and you may be given a sedative to help you relax. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is done under general anesthesia, which will put you to sleep for the duration of the operation. This will relax the muscles of the abdominal wall allowing your surgeon room to work. A breathing tube will be temporarily inserted through your mouth and into your throat to help you breathe during the operation. You may also have an oral gastric tube placed through your mouth an into your stomach to help drain fluids produced there. Most cases take between thirty and sixty minutes to perform. rnrnTo gain access to your gallbladder and surrounding structures, your surgeon will use sharp instruments called trocars to create a series of small holes or ports through your abdominal wall. One of these ports is usually located at the naval or umbilicus. Carbon dioxide gas is then pumped through the umbilical port to pump up your abdomen so its contents can be viewed more easily. Next, your surgeon will insert the laparoscope through the umbilical port. Images from its camera are projected onto a video monitor in the operating room. Using other instruments passed through the various ports, your surgeon will grasp the gallbladder, clip off its main artery and duct, drop it into a specimen bag and remove it through one of the ports. Before removing the laparoscope, your surgeon will take one final look around for areas of bleeding or other damage. When the laparoscope is removed, a port valve is left in place briefly to allow all the carbon dioxide to escape from the abdomen. Finally, the keyhole incisions are closed with sutures or staples and covered with bandages.rnrnAfter the surgery, your breathing and oral gastric tubes will be removed and you will be taken to the recovery area for monitoring. You will be given pain medication as needed and will progress slowly from a liquid to a soft to a solid diet. Your intravenous lines will be removed once your gastrointestinal system recovers. Most elective cholecystectomy patients can leave the hospital within twenty-four hours. Patients with infected gallbladders may need to stay one or two more days.

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